News timeline



We have to stop waving migrants through, says EU chief: Juncker speaks out after emergency summit turns sour 

  • European leaders accuse each other of shirking their duty to refugees
  • Reception centres for 100,000 more will be built to help them in winter 
  • Hundreds more border guards will be deployed at Balkan flashpoints
  • Germany's Angela Merkel requested emergency summit to tackle crisis

By Tamara Cohen, Political Correspondent for the Daily Mail

Published: 20:39 EST, 26 October 2015 | Updated: 20:39 EST, 26 October 2015

View
comments

EU president Jean-Claude Juncker has warned countries to stop ‘waving people through’ if Europe is to bring its deepening migration crisis under control.

He spoke out after an emergency summit of European leaders turned acrimonious – each accusing the other of shirking their duty to refugees pouring into the Balkans from Syria and elsewhere in the Middle East.

While the mud-slinging is likely to continue, it was agreed to build reception centres for 100,000 more people – half in Greece, and the rest across the Balkans – to help them survive the freezing winter in eastern Europe.

Human tide: Migrants are taken through fields in Slovenia, which says it has been overwhelmed by the influx 

Human tide: Migrants are taken through fields in Slovenia, which says it has been overwhelmed by the influx 

Moving: Migrants are escorted by police  towards a holding camp in the village of Dobova  in Slovenia last night

Moving: Migrants are escorted by police towards a holding camp in the village of Dobova in Slovenia last night

Light in the darkness: Migrants keep warm at a fire as they wait to be taken to the holding camp by police

Light in the darkness: Migrants keep warm at a fire as they wait to be taken to the holding camp by police

Hundreds more border guards and finger-printing facilities will also be deployed at flashpoints in the region to stop refugees travelling undocumented.

The emergency ‘mini-summit’ of eastern European nations – some of them outside the EU – and Germany was requested by Angela Merkel to tackle the crisis along what has become known as the Western Balkans route.

Mrs Merkel’s critics accuse her of encouraging migrants to make the difficult journey by offering to take in 800,000 asylum seekers this year, prompting a huge dash across south-eastern Europe to reach Germany. 

Some states have already threatened to close their borders altogether, including some of those in the Schengen area within the EU – where people can travel without passports or visas.

Speaking out: EU president Jean-Claude Juncker (pictured in Brussels yesterday) has warned countries to stop ‘waving people through’ if Europe is to bring its deepening migration crisis under control

Speaking out: EU president Jean-Claude Juncker (pictured in Brussels yesterday) has warned countries to stop ‘waving people through’ if Europe is to bring its deepening migration crisis under control

Companion: A boy holds a Tigger toy as migrants  wait to enter a registration camp near Gevgelija, Macedonia

Companion: A boy holds a Tigger toy as migrants wait to enter a registration camp near Gevgelija, Macedonia

Wrapped up: Migrants wait to enter a makeshift camp at the Austrian-Slovenian border near Sentilj yesterday

Wrapped up: Migrants wait to enter a makeshift camp at the Austrian-Slovenian border near Sentilj yesterday

GERMANY'S EXTREMISM WARNING

German intelligence agencies warn that the huge influx of migrants to the country will include those with extremist views and very different values, it has been reported.

A security document has warned of the damaging consequences of Berlin’s open-door policy which is expected to see around one million enter the country this year alone.

It read: ‘We are importing Islamic extremism, Arab anti-Semitism, national and ethnic conflicts of other peoples as well as a different societal and legal understanding.’

Security sources also fear the integration of migrants ‘is no longer possible’ because so many already live in insular communities.

The document from the country’s four principal security and intelligence services, seen by German newspaper Welt am Sonntag, added: ‘German security agencies... will not be in the position to solve these imported security problems and thereby the arising reactions from Germany’s population.’

A senior official warned: ‘Mainstream civil society is radicalising because the majority don’t want migration and they are being forced by the political elite.’

In a 17-point plan agreed by the leaders in Brussels, all member states agreed that allowing refugees or migrants to cross the border into another country was ‘unacceptable’.

Mr Juncker told reporters: ‘We have made very clear that the policy of simply waving people through must be stopped, and that is what is going to happen.’

It was agreed to set up more finger-printing points, to manage the flow of migrants. 

Those from Afghanistan, Iraq, Bangladesh and Pakistan who are deemed not to need international protection, will be more sent back more quickly.

Greece – which in the past week has seen 9,000 people arrive every day – has agreed to host reception centres for 50,000, despite concerns that this will be far too few. Another 50,000 will be hosted along the Western Balkan route.

The migration to Germany has seen bottlenecks develop in southern and eastern Europe. Tiny Slovenia has been swamped by 75,000 arrivals in the past few days. 

Hungary closed its border with Serbia in September. This has diverted migrants westwards – 260,000 have passed through Croatia since.

Mrs Merkel said after the summit: ‘This is one of the greatest litmus tests that Europe has ever faced.’

Croatian leader Zoran Milanovi said only tough border controls between Turkey and Greece would work, adding: ‘Everything else is a waste of time’.

MOST WATCHED NEWS VIDEOS

MOST READ NEWS


Article Tags

    No tags for this article

About the author

What's next