Hillary and Bill Clinton WILL make a political comeback

  • Hillary and Bill Clinton are looking at a series of reports to diagnose what went wrong with her 2016 bid for the White House 
  • Allies and party leaders suspect the couple will eventually return to campaigning and fundraising for the Democratic Party, though won't run for office again 
  • Those moves could come as soon as the next few months, as there will be gubernatorial elections in Virginia and New Jersey this fall 
  • According to Politico's reporting, Clinton's inner circle is advising a 'wait-and-see' approach as her poll numbers could rebound if President Trump's sink
  • 'I'm certain Trump will screw up enough by the fall of '18, Hillary's numbers will be way up again,' predicted ex-Pennsylvania Gov. Ed Rendell  

By Nikki Schwab, U.s. Political Reporter For Dailymail.com

Published: 16:54 EST, 23 January 2017 | Updated: 17:32 EST, 23 January 2017

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The 2016 Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton is looking at a series of reports to examine what went wrong as she and Bill Clinton figure out what's next for the couple who have dominating their party's politics for 25 years. 

Politico talked to a number of Clinton allies who say the former secretary of state is waiting out the Democratic National Committee chair election in February  – as it's shaping up to be an ideological rematch of the Clinton versus Sen. Bernie Sanders Democratic primary war. 

Their inner circle is also advocating a 'wait-and-see' approach before she steps into a more public-facing role  – in part so they can see if President Donald Trump's poll numbers sink, which in turn means Hillary Clinton's could rise. 

'I'm certain Trump will screw up enough that by the fall of '18, Hillary's numbers will be way up again,' predicted Clinton friend and former Pennsylvania Gov. Ed Rendell to the online publication, referring to the timing of the congressional midterm elections, the party's next big test. 

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Hillary and Bill Clinton are combing through reports, writes Politico, trying to learn where she fell short in the 2016 presidential race  Hillary and Bill Clinton are combing through reports, writes Politico, trying to learn where she fell short in the 2016 presidential race 

Hillary and Bill Clinton are combing through reports, writes Politico, trying to learn where she fell short in the 2016 presidential race 

Hillary Clinton's allies will be running for office - and be running many of the Democratic groups in Washington, D.C. - so she's expected to eventually help the party once more  Hillary Clinton's allies will be running for office - and be running many of the Democratic groups in Washington, D.C. - so she's expected to eventually help the party once more 

Hillary Clinton's allies will be running for office - and be running many of the Democratic groups in Washington, D.C. - so she's expected to eventually help the party once more 

Clinton's detractors can take comfort in knowing that the former secretary of state, senator and first lady – nor her ex-president husband – will likely ever appear on a ballot again. 

'The Democratic Party does need new blood, new faces and I don't think Bill or Hillary Clinton would ever want to get back and run for anything,' said former Democratic Arkansas Sen. Mark Pryor to Politico. 

'I don't think a team of mules could drag them to do that,' Pryor added.   

So then, what's left for the Clintons to do? 

First the 2016 presidential campaign autopsy could sooth Democratic fundraisers, upset that their cash haul for the White House on down seemed to be a big waste. 

 As not only did the party lose the White House unexpectedly to a political novice, but Democrats didn't overtake Republicans in the Senate, which they had seemed poised to do. 

'She understands that a forensic exam of the campaign is necessary, not only for her, but for the party and other electeds, and for the investors in the campaign,' said a Clinton friend to Politico who didn't want to be named. 

Allies of the Clintons are suggesting a 'wait and see' approach when it comes to President Trump, with the idea that if his poll numbers plummet hers will rise  Allies of the Clintons are suggesting a 'wait and see' approach when it comes to President Trump, with the idea that if his poll numbers plummet hers will rise 

Allies of the Clintons are suggesting a 'wait and see' approach when it comes to President Trump, with the idea that if his poll numbers plummet hers will rise 

In that scenario, the Clintons could really help the Democrats raise money and get candidates elected from a local to a national level  In that scenario, the Clintons could really help the Democrats raise money and get candidates elected from a local to a national level 

In that scenario, the Clintons could really help the Democrats raise money and get candidates elected from a local to a national level 

'People want to know that their investment was treated with respect, but that their mistakes wouldn't be repeated,' the source added.  

Clinton's former campaign manager Robby Mook and members of his team are putting together presentations that include where there were date and polling errors and where in the electorate she underperformed, a Democrat familiar with the project told Politico.    

Bill Clinton has also been involved, poring over the precinct-level data, while complaining to friends about the involvement of FBI Director James Comey – who received a warm embrace yesterday in the White House from President Trump – and the Russians' involvement in the election, Politico learned.  

He's also resumed his work at the Clinton Foundation, which had its reputation rattled during the presidential campaign. 

Coming down the pipeline are two elections that people like to read like tea leaves for what's to come in the next set of primaries – the gubernatorial races in New Jersey and Virginia. 

From there, the Clintons have a number of allies, including Sens. Sherrod Brown of Ohio and Bob Casey of Pennsylvania, who are up for re-election in Trump friendly states the following fall. 

 'It someone they knew was running for the Senate or the Statehouse or City Hall, it would be out of character for them not to be supportive,' Bill Clinton's original White House chief of staff Mack McLarty, told Politico.    

Other party leaders and allies, too, said they believed the Clintons would be fundraising and campaigning again, perhaps even in the next several months.

Some in the party have suggested deploying the political couple to red states, to help raise money for local election, which tend to be underfunded and ignored by those in the national scene.  

Politico pointed out that a number of groups that will help in the rebuilding of the Democratic party have Clinton ties at the top too. 

There's the Priorities USA super PAC, which is steered by Guy Cecil. 

The John Podesta-founded think tank, the Center for American Progress continued to be run by ally Neera Tanden. 

And David Brock, an ex-conservative who embraced the Clintons and now runs a number of liberal groups, will also continue to have the couple's back.  

'I would be surprised [to see Bill Clinton step way from politics] only because he has so many friends who are still involved, who he's worked with for so many years,' Skip Rutherford, the dean of the University of Arkansas' Clinton School of Public Services told Politico.  

Rutherford noted that 'many of the people who are involved in the political world got their stars in the Clinton world, so there's a whole base of people who are connected to both Clintons.'    

'Many Democratic politicians have been personally influenced or share direct ties to President Clinton, Secretary Clinton, or both,' McLarty echoed to Politico.

He predicted they'd eventually both play roles in the party going forward. 

 'And despite the grave disappointment, resilience is in the Clintons' DNA,' McLarty said. 'So while I certainly don't expect to see them trying to assert their authority, I think there will be natural and welcome opportunities for them to engage.' 

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